Using windows hosts file

Windows hosts file, located under “[SystemDriveLetter]:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc” is very useful when you have to test your web applications hosted either locally or on a remote server and you do not wish to map them to your DNS.

Let’s take an example where you have a website named : http://www.my-simple-web-application.com. You will most likely have 3-4 versions of the application dev, preprod, test, live (where live would be http://www.my-simple-web-application.com)

To facilitate testing you could come up with a standard way of addressing these environments :

http://dev.my-simple-web-application.com
http://preprod.my-simple-web-application.com
http://test.my-simple-web-application.com

Each of these sub-domains might point to the same or different servers. This is where the hosts file comes handy, you can configure something like :

127.0.0.1 dev.my-simple-web-application.com
127.0.0.1 preprod.my-simple-web-application.com
127.0.0.1 test.my-simple-web-application.com

In this example all IP addresses are local, you can change them as needed, beware that this configuration should be place on each desktop (development and test) that you want to use these sub-domains.

On another note, this configuration can also be achieve network wide if you have a configurable router where you can add global hosts.

There a number of other situations where hosts file can be helpful :
1) You are migrating your website to a new server, in this case you can specify you existing domain name in the hosts file and point it to the IP of the new server
2) You have multiple web servers hosting the same application and one of them is not working properly you can target the mischievous server and change your host file to point only this server.